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Every Day is Earth Day!

Here are 8 ways you can make every day Earth Day!!:

1. Use reusable bags
Get yourself some cute reusable bags and keep them in your car. Moving forward, simply decline plastic bags from cashiers and don’t use individual bags for your produce at the grocery store. Scientists estimate that every square mile of ocean contains approximately 46,000 pieces of plastic floating in it (United Nations Environment Programme). So you can have a massive impact on that statistic by making this small shift to your shopping routine.

2. Go outside
In his book, Last Child in The Woods, Richard Louv notes “Though we often see ourselves as separate from nature, humans are also part of that wildness.”

If we have a relationship with the planet, we are more likely to identify as connected to it, and feel a responsibility to protect it. Go outside every day and get up close and personal with nature, don’t wait for Earth Day to make it a priority.

3. Don’t eat meat
I know this might suprise you, but when it comes to climate change, following a plant-based diet would cut food-related emissions by 70% according to Oxford University.

If you can’t give up meat completely, doing your best to drastically decrease your intake of animal products is a great start. Learn to love a plant-based diet and your body and the planet will thank you.

4. Recycle
We have heard this most of our lives, but how many people are actually doing it all the time? Not all stores and restaurants offer recycling options and I know not everyone is like me and brings a cardboard beverage holder home to recycle versus just throwing it in the trash for convenience. Almost everything is recyclable these days, from paper products to electronics, so there is almost always a positive alternative to sending something to the landfill. According to Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, recycling of one ton of paper saves 17 trees and 7000 gallons of water!

5. Buy organic foods and products
According to the FOA (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) “By opting for organic products, the consumer through his/her purchasing power promotes a less polluting agricultural system. The hidden costs of agriculture to the environment in terms of natural resource degradation are reduced.”

When you go to the grocery store or farmer’s market, you are voting with your dollars on what type of agriculture system you want to support. Vote for an organic system that doesn’t use synthetic herbicides and pesticides to make every day Earth Day. These chemicals are not only foreign to your body, but also harmful to the water, air and environment as a whole.

6. Replace plastic products with glass
There are amazing alternatives to plastic now (Pyrex and Mason Jars are two of my favorites) and you can purchase glass cups, plates, tupperware and more without breaking the bank. Not only does this help you avoid the toxins in plastic, but it also reduces its overall production. “Plastics manufacture makes up 4.6% of the annual petroleum consumption in the U.S., using roughly 331 million barrels per year” (Plastics, Human Health and the Road Ahead). And as we know, the plastic itself isn’t really something you want in your life. Make conscious purchasing decisions when it comes to products commonly made of plastic.

7. Compost
There’s no reason to throw out your organic food byproducts when you can easily compost it. If you live in a city and don’t need compost yourself, there are typically companies that will collect it from you for a small fee. You will not only be creating less waste, but by composting, the creation of greenhouse gases, like methane, is avoided. Additionally, “compost replenishes and revitalizes exhausted farm soils by replacing trace minerals and organic material, reduces soil erosion and helps prevent storm water runoff” according to Eureka Recycling So by composting your food byproducts, you are actually helping more food grow!

8. Eliminate the use of household cleaners with toxic ingredients
Most people don’t think of their household cleaners as pollutants. Unfortunately, just because we’ve assumed that cleaning supplies are doing just that — cleaning — it doesn’t mean they aren’t also contributing to smog and lowering the quality of tap water. (EPA) Instead of using the toxic cleaners, you can find make your own alternative cleaners to keep your home and surrounding environment safer... and squeaky clean!

16 Reasons to Love and Preserve the Ocean

The ocean can be described in an endless number of ways. It's refreshing, beautiful and humbling. It's vast, mysterious and terrifying. It's magnificence has inspired countless novels, films, documentaries, songs, and news articles.

If it were a god, it would already have millions of devoted disciples -- divers, scientists, surfers, biologists, ocean-going enthusiasts -- who are in constant awe of its power and beauty. That's why, for World Oceans Day, we wanted to explore the reasons we are all drawn to the sea.

Below, 16 reasons the ocean, our beloved resource, is one of the most fascinating elements on our planet Earth.

1. The ocean covers over 70 percent of our planet's surface and contains about 99 percent of the living space on Earth.
According to the MarineBio Conservation Society, humans have only explored less then 10% of that "living space," which pretty much means we know absolutely nothing about the blue marble of a world we live in:

 

2. An estimated 2.2 million species live in the ocean.
Between 50 to 80% of all life on Earth is under the sea:

 

3. Like this jellyfish that ages backwards.
The Turritopsis dohrnii (a.k.a. the "immortal" jellyfish) has the ability to transform itself into a younger state:

 

4. Or this horseshoe crab.
They've existed on Earth for over 300 million years. That's older than the dinosaurs:

 

5. Or the largest and heaviest animal to ever exist.
The blue whale, which is listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act, can grow as long as 100 feet and weigh up to 330,000 pounds:

 

6. But let's talk about the one fish that everyone is absolutely fascinated with -- sharks.
Love 'em or hate 'em, these toothy fish are one parts terrifying, a thousand parts misunderstood. While they are considered an apex predator of the sea, you are at a higher risk of dying from a mosquito bite than a shark:

 

7. Sharks are actually designed to be the ultimate ocean navigators.
Shark skeleton is made of cartilage and its skin is covered with tiny toothlike scales, making them fierce swimming machines. And contrary to common belief, research has shown that sharks have sharp vision and are ten times more sensitive to light than humans -- perfect for preying in dark waters:

 

8. Speaking of dark waters, the average depth of the ocean is around 14,000 feet.
That's more than 40 football fields, from end zone to end zone. There, magnificent, bioluminescent, and sometimes even scary creatures roam about a dark world, like this viperfish:

 

And bioluminescent jellies, also known as ctenophore:

 

9. But, in lighter waters, where the sun rays glow, a magnificent forest emerges.
Kelp forests have the ability to grow up to 18 inches per day, creating the perfect, nutrient-rich playground for seals, sea lions, whales and birds:

 

And adorable sea otters:

 

10. The world's ocean is arguably the most important resource we, as citizens of Earth, have.
Aside from the oceans comprising most of our planet, it is a source of food for hundreds of thousands of species. Sadly,overfishing and other human-created pollution are responsible for harming our greatest resource. If we continue, we may eventually run out of fish, setting a domino effect of disaster. That could mean no more beautiful, thriving reefs like this:

 

Or this mesmerizing bait ball -- press play and watch the hypnotic fish gather by the thousands to protect themselves from predators like dolphins, sharks and birds (yes, aerial attackers swooping in from above):

11. And don't get us started on how naturally clever the ocean can be.
Ever thought, 'Silly Spongebob, how can there be a lake under the sea?' Turns out, we are the silly ones. In parts of the world, like in the waters of Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, hydrogen sulfate mixes with saltwater, making it heavier than regular saltwater and causing it to sink to the bottom and flow like a river:

 

12. The sea is actually way more physically diverse than that tropical beach on your phone's wallpaper.
It's frigid and cold:

 

It's fiercely rough and stormy:

 

But, of course, it's also warm, crystal clear and incredibly inviting:

13. And when the elements align in perfect unison, it's the ultimate playground.

But remember, the ocean isn't just a playground, nor is it only ours. It is a resource we must protect if we want to continue to enjoy it like this:

14. Can we just step back for a moment and take in just how simply beautiful the ocean is?
By the way, submersing yourself in the salty sea is actually good for your mental and physical health:

Deep breath in...

Deep breath out...

15. While we humans don't have gills (yet), the ocean can be one of our greatest spiritual sanctuaries.
Anyone who spends a lot of time in the ocean -- surfing through waves, diving in deep waters, sailing across the world -- can tell you just how humbling the power of the sea is. It can heighten the senses and can give you the most heartfelt and emotional thrill of your life:

16. The ocean, whether we realize it or not, is the world's most shared resource, jointly used by billions of humans all across the globe.
The sea provides us with air to breathe (ocean plants provide half the world's oxygen), gives us food to eat (around 3.5 billion people rely on the ocean as their primary food source), and even helps boost our economy (one in every six jobs is marine related). The Polynesian Voyaging Society recently began a three year voyage around the world in a wooden canoe, using ancient wayfaring techniques, to prove that we are all connected and need to take care of Mother Earth, just as she takes care of us:

Help Save Our Seas. Get involved. For more on what you can do check out these amazing organizations:

http://oceana.org/

http://www.5gyres.org/ 

http://www.seashepherd.org/

http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/oceans

https://www.surfrider.org/